A Beautiful Day in our Neighborhood!

Our investigations of Latin verbs have been most interesting!  We have uncovered many twin bases which helped us understand the difference in spelling when looking at word pairs like:

produce / production
consume / consumption
describe / description
invade / invasion
respond / response

But then again, we have also uncovered many twin bases which helped us understand the meaning connections when looking at word pairs like:

lava / lotion
obstruction / misconstrue
frangible / infraction
individual / visage

If we go with the analogy in which words that share a base are like members of a family, then the following pictures offer proof that the fifth graders in our school live in a wonderfully diverse neighborhood!

DSCN5148 DSCN5149 DSCN5150 DSCN5155

Here are three more films in which students share their Latin Verb investigations.  The first is a combination of what two groups found out about the Latin Verb Duco Ducere Duxi Ductus.

This group looked at Frango Frangere Fregi Fractus.

The following two groups investigated Scribo Scribere Scripsi Scriptus.

 

2 thoughts on “A Beautiful Day in our Neighborhood!

  1. Old Grouch, what a wonderful investigation and truly entertaining!
    MaryBeth, you are amazing at sparking great thinking skills in your students. How bold posting the investigations in the hallway. Bravo! You and your students are an inspiration. I love the process and the results. Brilliant.

  2. What an amazing sight – twin bases as far as the eye can see – and the official schooling literacy industry hasn’t the slightest idea of what a twin base element is, and that it is a fact of English orthography.

    These student scholars know, understand and can explain more about English orthographic morphology than the biggest wigs of the supposed ’researchers’.

    I raise my hat to these young and competent orthographers!

    I also offer them a challenge, which I know they will both enjoy and resolve with brio. Here it is.

    Prove which of ‘individual’ and ‘visage’ is cognate with a term for someone whose spouse is deceased, and then give an explanation of the term ‘homographic twin base element’.

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